An epidemic of maladjustment


The news makes me tired. Really. I read from line to line, looking for something positive, but no, it’s like a whirlwind of despair has struck the heart of America, and Europe, for that matter. Maybe it is different in parts of Asia, South America, and Africa (and of course, Australia, New Zeeland, and everywhere else), but the news does seem awfully depressing around here.

And that is why I put down my newspaper, walked away from the internet news screens, and found a nice little book to reconnect with what is good in the world. I had to travel in my mind over a hundred years back, but the story helped me recover some sense of relaxation. Unfortunately, that cannot be said of most of the rest of America and Europe, both sporting recent polls showing a growing class of maladjustment within their citizens.

The Maladjusted, or the Depressed Class, reflects a group of citizens sharing three things in common- a state of “uncontrollable” depression or despair, an inability to cope with the status quo, and a daily or near daily regimen of anti-depressant drug use that includes some of the most dangerous mentally altering drugs available.

Considering how potentially dangerous this is to the rest of us, it is a much lighter thing to discuss North Korean aggression or other current political alarms. Countries are much larger unwieldy entities, but individuals, like the Boston Marathon Bombers, are much more tangibly destructive.

That is why I believe the medical community should revisit the prescription of so many of these hallucinagenic drugs being used to “fight” depression. So many of them cause suicide and destruction, that each drug merits more study. I am not a doctor, but I know what I see- too many people living on the edge with edgy medicines that make them less able to cope than they were before “treatment.”

Still, it is even worse to mix a depressed state with a misguided agenda. For those who believe in exalting death or who distrust every social convention around them,  the maladjusted become an even more toxic cocktail.

So, if you are going to have socialized medicine of any kind within a nation, it would be rational to make a greater attempt to find better mental health care solutions for depressed patients, using treatments that work and do not exacerbate the problem.

I welcome your thoughts/comments on this….

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About thelostkerryman

Thelostkerryman is an author, entrepreneur, and disciple- this side of Tir Na N'Og- living in the forests of a consistently confused country. Here in this hill country, hurling doesn't usually involve a hurley, store-made soda bread resembles an inedible Irish megalith, and Kerrygold is only found hidden like a luck penny in the belly of Kroger. This blog is an account of his adventures, thoughts, eclectic -and eccentric- ramblings, random or insightful poetry, humor and non-humor, pictures (photos), video, essays, fiction, poetic fiction, nonfiction, drama, and writing he has not classified in the description above. All of my posts, thelostkerryman.wordpress.com, everydayasadisciple.wordpress.com, and mrandmrsboring.wordpress.com are copywrited according to international copywrite law.
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6 Responses to An epidemic of maladjustment

  1. queenlorene says:

    I have bipolar disorder, and the medication I take is vital for balancing my mood. I am grateful for it. Before I started theapy, I was a misery to myself and everyone around me. I held off for 25 years, refusing to take anything and suffered hospitalization and constant suicidal ideation. The mood swings were so bad that I could turn manic with just a song to trigger it, then dive into horrible depression just hours later. While anti-depressants and mental disorder drugs aren’t a panacea for all, they are necessary for some. The problem is that most people just go to their GP, who stick them on anti-depressants without evaluation from an expert or exploration into therapy first. There is also mounting evidence that some depression is immune mediated, which may be brought on by stress. It is a complicated issue for sure.

    • I’m glad that medicine has worked for you. It is indeed a complicated issue, but one we all might keep aware, while there are incidents from wrongly-medicated individuals who harm themselves or others.

      Thank you for sharing transparently and for your insight and knowledge.

  2. Pingback: Continued: A True Story about Mental Illness | Did Jesus have a Facebook Page?

  3. have a daughter that is bi-polar and borderline schizophernic, most of the time she cannot afford her meds that help her the consequences are dire for anyone around her including her 7 yr old son. there is no help available and no hospitializtion or treatment center that will help without insurance. There were facilities when she was younger but have been closed due to lack of funding, I suppose as this is everywhere in the States it must be true elsewhere. My heart pains everyday thinking of both my loved ones and what that little boy will turn out and what he goes thru as she refuses to let us know where she lives or to see her or my g-son. Without funds there is no help for these people and doctors don’t help when they just write perscriptions so they can move on to the next patient. It is a sad and sorry state of affairs that we treat humans worse than most animals.

    • Having several medical experts within my extended family, I do have to admit that apart from them, I have met some real “head cases,” doctors who prescribe a laundry list to the patient without thorough thought or care- sometimes because of overwork and a shortage of physicians, sometimes because they are emotionally shielded or have practiced being indifferent, due to the extreme nature of the job, and sometimes…God only knows why…maybe they have problems themselves, or they are incpompetent. Case in point-

      I once bruised my ribs and visited an ER for treatment, not knowing whether I had broken them or just badly bruised them in the accident. The attending physician prescribed a triad of incompatable medicines that included a drug recalled by the FDA just a few days before the ER doctor prescribed them to me. Suffice to say, I didn’t take them and never returned to that hospital again!

  4. I don’t often leave a reply, however i did some searching and ended up in this article. I must say that’s an amazing posting there. I’d want to follow anything new you have to publish.

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